Beauty at Any Age

by Feifei Sun

All eyes may be on the bride, but that doesn’t mean mothers of the bride don’t want to look great, too. Here, a few local experts share their favorite wedding beauty treatments and tips, from head to toe, for both the bride and her mom to turn heads on the big day.


Refine Savannah // refinesavannah.com

REPEAT FOR RESULTS

“There’s no magic facial that’s going to fix everything overnight,” says Janie Futch, co-owner of Refine Savannah, a boutique medical spa. She recommends getting on a consistent skin regimen four to six months before the wedding. 

Futch recommends chemical peels for brides dealing with acne or hyperpigmentation, while microneedling, also known as collagen induction, is effective for a brighter, more youthful glow. Even if a months-long commitment isn’t possible, repetition is key: “You want at least two to three treatments for best results.”


“There’s no magic facial that’s going to fix everything overnight.”  — Janie Futch, CO-OWNER, REFINE SAVANNAH


Savannah Plastic Surgery // savannahplasticsurgery.com

PLAN AHEAD

     If you’re considering Botox, Karen Bouchard, PA-C, at Savannah Plastic Surgery agrees that planning ahead will assure your skin is smooth and ready on wedding day. “You would want to schedule Botox four weeks prior to the event,” she says. “This allows plenty of time for the product to settle in and perfect the look.”


Low Country Dermatology // lowcountrydermatology.com

GO GENTLE THE WEEK OF THE WEDDING

Make sure to get all major treatments the week before the wedding to give skin time to calm down. The week of the event, Kaitlyn Smith of Low Country Dermatology says a hydrating mask can be a soothing way to add moisture to skin. “Cold rolling with an ice roller is also an easy way to minimize any inflammation or puffiness on the face.”


Savannah Facial Plastic Surgery // savannahfacialplasticsurgery.com

A GOOD ROUTINE STARTS AT HOME

Spa treatments can do wonders for the skin and body, but a good, over-the-counter product can also go a long way, says Kim Richardson, an esthetician at Savannah Facial Plastic Surgery. “Add a mild alpha hydroxy acid, like lactic, to your routine to brighten skin,” she says.


40 Volume Salon // 40volume.com

A LITTLE OIL CAN BE GOOD

The stylists at 40 Volume Salon suggest washing hair the night before the big day, rather than the morning of, as curls and other styles hold up better. And if you want any face-framing pieces, get a fresh haircut the week before.


DON’T IGNORE OFTEN-OVERLOOKED AREAS

Glow Medical Spa //
glowsavannah.com

One treatment that Sophia Antonellis, director of marketing for Glow Medical Spa, likes for mothers of the bride is laser therapy to help reduce the appearance of sunspots and aging–particularly on overlooked areas like the hands. “It’s the small areas that people often haven’t thought of that giveaway signs of aging,” she says. Laser therapy is best done three weeks before the big day, in case you have a negative reaction. 

Elsewhere, Kaitlyn Smith, an esthetician at Low Country Dermatology, suggests getting an eyebrow wax or dye: “It may sound like something minor, but not having to worry about filling in your brows can be a huge stress relief and time saver.”


BEETTAN // beettan.com // left photo by KATIE McGEE

SUN-KISSED SKIN WITHOUT THE SUN

For brides who want the look of a tan without committing to (or the harmful effects of) hours in the sun, BEETTAN founder Michelle Peth recommends her self tanning lotion, a buildable formula that goes on clear and stays on without staining. “I suggest two applications the week of the wedding, starting 24 to 48 hours before the big day,” she says. “It’s also the perfect product for destination weddings, since you can apply it yourself and build up to the coverage you want.” Peth also offers spray tan treatments for mothers of the bride who prefer a one-and-done treatment.



Feifei Sun is a writer and editor born in China and raised in the American South — Savannah, Georgia, to be exact. She previously worked as an editor at Vanity Fair and Time magazines, and her writing has also appeared in Dwell, Slate, Real Simple and more.