Monogram Maven

Whether you’re saving the date or embellishing your linens, the stationery expert behind Emma J Design holds the secrets to this time-honored Southern tradition.   |   By Emily McCarthy

 

Monogram Styles

(Top row, left to right)

The Three-letter Monogram

When representing a single person, the first name is indicated by the letter on the left, the middle name is indicated by the letter on the right, and the last name is indicated by the letter in the middle.  Example shown: Emily Joy McCarthy

The One-letter Monogram

Single letters may be used to represent either a first name or a last name.  Example shown: Mary or McCarthy

The Marriage Monogram

When representing a marriage, the wife’s name is indicated by the letter on the left, the husband’s name is indicated by the letter on the right, and the last name is represented by the larger letter in the middle.  This style is not used until after the wedding ceremony.  Example shown: Emily and Patrick McCarthy

(Bottom row, left to right)

The Two-letter Monogram

When representing two first names, a first and last name or a joint household with two different last names, interlocking letters may be used.  Example shown: Emily Phillips, Emily and Patrick or Emerson-Phillips

The One-letter Interlock Monogram

Single letters may be duplicated and interlocked to represent a first name or last name.  Example shown: Mary or McCarthy

Two-letter Interlock Monogram

When using vintage interlocking letters as shown here, it is acceptable to represent one letter twice to create a more symmetrical appearance in the monogram design.  Example shown: Kevin McCarthy or Katie and Kevin McCarthy